Carabiner care

If you are a beginner climber and want to ask other climbers any questions - then this is the place to ask.
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Edwin
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Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2011 12:20 pm
Real Name: Edwin van Tonder

Carabiner care

Post by Edwin »

Hi there

I've heard recently that dropping an aluminium crabiner from as little as a metre high can result in hairline cracks and should then be disgarded, even when no cracks are visible to the naked eye. Is this accurate?
Seems a little extreme to me.
pierre.joubert
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Re: Carabiner care

Post by pierre.joubert »

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Last edited by pierre.joubert on Mon Apr 12, 2021 11:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
pierre.joubert
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Re: Carabiner care

Post by pierre.joubert »

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Last edited by pierre.joubert on Mon Apr 12, 2021 11:20 am, edited 2 times in total.
Edwin
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Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2011 12:20 pm
Real Name: Edwin van Tonder

Re: Carabiner care

Post by Edwin »

I still don't have a straight answer(I'm new at this,remember).So buying steel, altough adding more weight, would be the better option for us mere beginner noobs?
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justin
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Re: Carabiner care

Post by justin »

Edwin wrote:I've heard recently that dropping an aluminium crabiner from as little as a metre high can result in hairline cracks and should then be discarded, even when no cracks are visible to the naked eye. Is this accurate? Seems a little extreme to me.
Do not buy steel biners to go rock climbing with, they're just too heavy. No one can give you a clear answer to your question and so you will have to read between the lines.

In theory, yes there is a chance you could cause a crack in the biner by dropping it from 1m - however this very unlikely! The only way to check for these cracks is to x-ray them (which is costly).

There is no clear / easy way to know if a piece of gear (any alloy climbing equipment) that gets dropped from a height (that you deem to be damaging) should be replaced (the landing ground can make a difference too e.g. solid rock vs beach sand vs bush).

It really is up to you to make the decision. If you dropped a carabiner from 1 meter and it bothers you to the point where it is constantly on your mind, I say remove it from your rack (rather than worrying about it later when you are 5 meters above it).

As you can see in from this thread, most of the dirtbags.. ehem I mean climbers ;) are keen to accept your freshly '1 meter dropped' biners (knowing that you to the sport) and put them back into service on their own racks. This is comforting to know, yes?

Biners are tougher than you think and manufacturers have to put their disclaimers in as the chance for failure is there.
There is no clear answer for this and each climber must make call on the gear that they drop (bearing in mind that your climbing partner will often be dependant on your gear too.

This come of the web and essentially tells you nothing as well:
From crabdev.co.uk
During normal use a carabiner is likely to be dropped onto hard surfaces, aluminium alloy carabiners often sustain minor surface indentations and scratches from these impacts and continue to hold falls without failure. The drop height could vary from less than 1 m to hundreds of metres, although a carabiner is unlikely to be reused after a drop of that distance. A composite carabiner might incur defects or delamination from these kinds of impacts. This internal damage would not necessarily be visible [10] to the naked eye and other forms of non-destructive testing (NDT), such as ultrasound, would be required.

If you are still confused and unsure what to do, refer to Pierre's insert above 'Ardito Gersen on rec.climbing'
Climb ZA - Administrator
justin@climbing.co.za
pierre.joubert
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Re: Carabiner care

Post by pierre.joubert »

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Last edited by pierre.joubert on Mon Apr 12, 2021 11:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
Edwin
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Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2011 12:20 pm
Real Name: Edwin van Tonder

Re: Carabiner care

Post by Edwin »

Thanks for the information, It really put things into perspective for me.

My argument is this:If micro cracks where possible from anything under 2 metres, then surely the carabiners would have been bubble wrapped and foam packed and what not, straight from the manufacturer onto the shelf where we buy them from.The best "packaging" is a clear little plastic bag, more likely the carabiner will be hanging from a display hook for anybody to take off,and most probably drop it on the shop floor, then simply putting it back in its place without a thought.
So my "brand new" carabiner went trhough plenty of hands from manufacturer to shop, ect.

Personally, I'll be using mine until I see some clear damage.

Thanks to all for input. :thumleft:
mokganjetsi
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Real Name: Willem Boshoff
Location: Cape Town

Re: Carabiner care

Post by mokganjetsi »

thread on this same topic:

http://www.rockclimbing.com/cgi-bin/for ... =ASC;mh=25;

it is concerning that no manufacturers have addressed the "myth" of hairline fissures, but i think it is to their advantage to not do that.

anyways, nothing a mudbat can't fix hehehe :mrgreen:
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