Quantcast
It is currently Thu Aug 28, 2014 3:48 am

All times are UTC + 2 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: coke on my rope
PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2007 11:00 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Dec 15, 2006 12:32 pm
Posts: 1167
Location: Cape Town
Real Name: Willem Boshoff
i read the article posted under rope test regarding rope breakage - lank interesting. it seems that the only 2 causes identified for rope breakage is being loaded over a sharp edge and exposure to acid (in published cases it was sulpheric / battery acid).

now my irk: a friend spilled some coke on my rope a year or two ago. i did not think anything of it until now: coke has two acidic ingredients in phosphoric acid and citric acid. coke is known for its cleaning ability due to these 2 ingredients.

oh crap, what now? anybody have any scientific evidence that i should not chuck my rope away?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2007 11:11 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Feb 13, 2007 5:38 pm
Posts: 92
Real Name: Leon Nel
Mok, definetly have to chuck that rope. if you drop it at my house, i'll galdly get rid of it for you.

:D

read http://www.climbsworegon.com/SAFETY/ROPE.html
here follows, but as always with internet based info, take it with a pinch of salt


TECH

In a report on dynamic climbing ropes Pitt Schubert, President of the UIAA safety commission found the following....

1. Ropes cannot break in the tie in knot, or at the running belay.

2. Use of twin ropes has cut down on breakage's.

3. There have been no known rope failures in sport climbing

4. Petrol, Diesel, WD40, Coke and sea water do not damage ropes.

5. Autan (insect repellent), although damaging to plastic, was not found to damage ropes...in fact strength was slightly increased.

6. UV radiation does not damage ropes. Nylon is UV stabilised and only the colour will be lost.

7. Standing on a rope loaded over a right-angled metal edge with three times body weight did not reduce a ropes strength.

8. Standing on a rope in the snow with crampons did no damage. Neither did standing on it on rock with a 75kg body weight. In a further test crampon points were forced right through the rope with no strength reduction/damage occurring!

9. The suggested life span of 10 years which has been given for ropes is to help the user determine life span . However, after contact with ICI it was found that although after 10 years there was a measurable degradation in nylon (not just in ropes, but all nylon textiles) ageing itself would not cause a rope to break, unless it was loaded over a sharp edge.

10. Top roping damaged ropes, but the damage was visible and could be felt. The same applied to damage from stonefall.

However, lest we become complacent...

1. Any rope can break when loaded over a sharp edge. It is not possible to produce a rope that is strong enough not to break when loaded over a sharp edge, however, the maximum chance for survival is with a new rope.

2. Car battery acid damages ropes and cannot be visibly detected.

3. Ropes soaked overnight in urine (!) had their strength reduced by 30%. However, this was only relevant when the rope was loadedover a sharp edge.

4. The strength of frozen and wet ropes was reduced but again, unless the rope is loaded over a sharp edge, it would not matter.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2007 11:53 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 9:54 am
Posts: 522
I have been told detergents aren't good for ropes as well. So if you going to wash your rope, the best thing is to soak it in cold water in a sink and then lay it out to dry in the shade. They say quick draws, slings should also be soaked in cold water and let to dry out in the shade to get dirt out of the nylon.

If rope get full of sand grain and if there is some drag the rock acts like sandpaper against the rope I have been told. Too much rope drag is bad, its best to avoid rope drag altogether.

How often should you wash a well looked after rope, once a year, once every six months?

http://class.et.byu.edu/mfg340/qualityreports/nylon.htm

A rope shouldn't be loaded over a sharp edge ever when climbing as the sharp edge could cut the rope.


Last edited by Drifter on Thu Jun 21, 2007 2:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2007 1:38 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 9:54 am
Posts: 522
\"Effects of water on the rope\"

\"Possible reasons why soaking the ropes contributed the most to premature breakage is the fact that the samples are not the type of rope that receive a \"dry\" treatment of silicon or teflon. These treatments would help the nylon not to absorb so much water. For this reason, many standard climbing ropes come pretreated to protect them from water. The dry ropes in the samples averaged .01 oz/in. The wet ropes (includes other factor settings) averaged .025 oz/in. This is an increase in weight of 253.4%. With the ropes retaining this much water, the capillary action of the fibers made the nylon much weaker.\"

Your opinions? Do you agree disagree?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2007 2:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Dec 15, 2006 12:32 pm
Posts: 1167
Location: Cape Town
Real Name: Willem Boshoff
oh, phew, good thanks mr chabalala. next time you pee on my rope you're going to be in trouble though - if you're going to do a scary lead, go to the toilet first.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2007 8:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 9:28 pm
Posts: 236
\"Effects of water on the rope\"

\"Possible reasons why soaking the ropes contributed the most to premature breakage is the fact that the samples are not the type of rope that receive a \"dry\" treatment of silicon or teflon. These treatments would help the nylon not to absorb so much water. For this reason, many standard climbing ropes come pretreated to protect them from water. The dry ropes in the samples averaged .01 oz/in. The wet ropes (includes other factor settings) averaged .025 oz/in. This is an increase in weight of 253.4%. With the ropes retaining this much water, the capillary action of the fibers made the nylon much weaker.\"

Your opinions? Do you agree disagree?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2007 11:12 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jun 08, 2005 8:49 pm
Posts: 293
There is a marginal drop in the elasticity of ropes when they are wet. This should not affect the overall strength but will reduce the shock absorbing properties.

So if we wrap a wet rope around drifters neck and throw him off a cliff will the rope break or drifter?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 9:12 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 5:49 pm
Posts: 31
Location: benoni
3. Ropes soaked overnight in urine (!) had their strength reduced by 30%. However, this was only relevant when the rope was loadedover a sharp edge.

Would the damage be more after a night of heavy drinking?

_________________
Waynarky
http://www.extremelysa.co.za
Adventure Sports Directory and Mobile Climbing Wall.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 2 hours


Who is online

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Exabot [Bot], Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot]


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group