packpack

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jono
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2011 12:03 pm
Real Name: jon kirkman

packpack

Post by jono »

Hi, am looking to buy a pack (budget about 1.25k). what do I need o be looking for in a bag? I'm fairly short (1.615m), so what determines the amount of weight that I can carry, aside from fitness? I read something somewhere about the distance between the seventh vertebra and the hips having something to do with this. What exactly? I have tried the k-way advance 65, but it is waaay too tall :( . Am thinking of the first ascent jupiter, is this worth looking at :?: ? What other bags should I be looking at :scratch: ? Anyone selling any bags? Any input appreciated. :afro:

jon


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justin
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Real Name: Justin Lawson
Location: Montagu/Cape Town
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Re: packpack

Post by justin »

I've got a FA Jupiter and am loving the bag. If you want a slightly smaller (shorter) bag then check out their Venus backpack (basically a smaller Jupiter).

- Quality product - the person who designed the old Backpacker range (think of the Thar which is a legendary bag) also designed FA's bags
- Hip belt design is comfy and works well (split design)
- Harness system is comfortable and well padded
- Caesarean zipper (to get into the middle of your pack)
- Straps everywhere (good for tying goods onto the bag)
- Lifetime guarantee on product
- The ripstop nylon is proving to be well tough (I've scraped through lots)
- Was very happy to make use of the removable rain cover last week!

- And last but not least... the pretty colours :wink:
justin@CapeTownClimbing.com
smityb
Posts: 81
Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2011 8:07 pm
Real Name: Brandon
Location: western cape

Re: packpack

Post by smityb »

The best way that i have found is to hit the shops, try on as many different packs then go home and mull over it. Things you need to look out for are: size(i had a FA jupiter and had to sell because it was just too big) the next thing is quality, look at brands like vaude(very good quality and comfy), First Ascent (made in SA - therefore easy to get repaired) and then Mountain Hardware which are amazing(very pricy but probably worth it). basically the best is to go to every shop that sells packs and find what suits you best, for me this is a Vaude astra 65L - really good quality, good size for my trips, and not a bad price, 1200 if i remember correctly.

Brandon
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Turtle
Posts: 206
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2010 11:20 pm
Real Name: Jacques Redelinghuys

Re: packpack

Post by Turtle »

Hey

What smityb said.

Come on over to CityROCK on the corner of Collingwood and Anson road in Observatory.

I can give you some info, and I'm about you height, so I know the challenges, erm, advantages a short guy has over the other taller okes!

:shock:
:afro:
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Nic Le Maitre
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Re: packpack

Post by Nic Le Maitre »

Hi

I suffer from the same problem, I'm rather short and it makes it difficult to use packs that do not have an adjustable back system. Very few manufacturers make packs in the 40-50l size range with adjustable back systems, most of them only sell packs with the straps sewn to the pack. There are a few exceptions: Osprey, Deuter, Backpacker (if you can find them) all make packs with adjustable back systems in the 40-50l size range. I have always been a fan of smaller packs, that way you only pack the essentials and all the (heavy) junk gets left behind.

If you cannot find one in the size range you want with adjustable straps, look for one where the shoulder straps are attached lower than the top of your shoulder (the lower the better) when the pack is empty and the hip belt is in the correct position (the belt should be at least partway above your hips). That should give you the most comfortable pack.

Some manufacturers (Black Diamond for one) make packs in different sizes, you will lose some capacity by taking a smaller size but will get a better fit.

All the different manufacturers make their packs for a different "standard/average human", so try as many as you can until you find one that suits your body best. There is no substitute for trying on packs. Get the guys at the shop to load up the pack with everything heavy they can find and try it then, walk around with it on for at least five minutes.
Happy climbing
Nic
Paul Goddard
Posts: 164
Joined: Thu Feb 28, 2008 3:55 pm

Re: packpack

Post by Paul Goddard »

Hi Jono

I just bought the Black Diamond 45l ''Epic''.
It truly is a world class back for a solid days cragging. It comes in three diff sizes specifically for different torso lengths.
I have a 65litre Deuter that is perfect for Tafelberg, but is waaaay to big for a days trad or sport climbing.
On the other end I had a Camelbak 35 litre ''Peakbagger'' which was waaaay too small for a good day of sportclimbing.
The BD Epic fits about 16 draws, a 60 metre rope, a harness, shoes, warm clothes, 2 litres of water, a lunchbox, and with ample other room for other crap and cameras, BUT, feels super snugg and small on your back.
Also perfect for a solid days trad to take all the above mentioned stuff when splitting the trad rack.
I am super impressed by it and beats the crap out of the Deuter and the Camelbak Peakbagger as a climbing pack. It comes in at around R1250.
5 stars in my opinion. :thumleft:
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Xharlie
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Re: packpack

Post by Xharlie »

Nothing beats an adjustable back height. If you can adjust the back-height so that the pack is correctly balanced, you're winning. Don't be too worried if the top of the pack is level with the top of your head (or higher, possibly). All this means is that you have to hike with a floppy hat or a cap instead of a full brim.

You want the pack to sit on your hips when you're standing normally - the shoulder straps are there to keep the pack upright, not to take much weight.
You should be able to walk normally without causing the pack to move around a lot.
You should NOT be able to dance the Samba when you pack is loaded!

There are some advantages to the (more modern) tall, thin style of pack - it behaves better when you're crossing rivers and hopping over rocks. Nothing is more embarrassing than taking a slow-motion fall into a raging torrent while your party looks on... except perhaps a head-first dive into the same torrent.

While fit is the supreme indicator of a good pack, some features that are useful include:
A proper hydration pack compartment with a velcro loop to keep the hydration pack from crumpling up and proper openings to feed the hose through. (Designed-in openings are better - they let less water in when it rains) (Yes, hydration packs are a hiker's best friend because there are few things less annoying than having to stop the party so someone can dig your liquid out of a pocket, somewhere, when you're thirsty.)
Waterproofing is vital! A tortoise-shell or similar water-proof cover is a must.
Try to buy a pack that features a main compartment that opens in many places, not just at the top. This is super convenient and results in much less time wasted faffing around in the dark.

I'm no pack connoisseur but I've done some hiking and have paid attention to what I carry and what people I've hiked with have carried. If this is your first pack, you may want to buy cheap or borrow a pack on the assumption (and almost certainty) that you'll want something different when you've got some experience of what other people carry. AND some idea of the style of hiker you are - some people hike up mountains with a spare pare of briefs and a bottle of water - others take a fully equipped kitchen, attire for any occasion and half a pub.
jono
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Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2011 12:03 pm
Real Name: jon kirkman

Re: packpack

Post by jono »

Hi guys, thanks for all the input, I really appreciate it :) . So, as far as I can make out, the brands to look at are FA and Vaude for a pack around 65l and BD for a smaller bag. What are Northridge bags like (esp the nomad 65 :?: ) Uh, Justin do you moonlight for First Ascent? :wink: ?? Anyway, its great to hear from people who have actually used the packs. I will be heading for our local outdoor shop soon (the staff will think I'm mad when I ask for weights). Hey, I wish I could make Cityrock, but I am based on the other side of the country :( .

cheers

jon :afro:
Marshall1
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Real Name: Derek Marshall
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Re: packpack

Post by Marshall1 »

BackPackers last for ever.

FA, Vaude or Kway look snazzy & comfortable, but do they last?
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justin
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Real Name: Justin Lawson
Location: Montagu/Cape Town
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Re: packpack

Post by justin »

jono wrote:Justin do you moonlight for First Ascent? :wink: ??
Not quite, however FA gave me a Jupiter to review (review coming soon) - too bad you're on the otherside, I would have been happy to loan you the bag for a try-out.

Marshall: FA had SA bush in mind when they designed their new range of bags, so no rips/tears to report so far!

Q: What do you want to use the bag for?
justin@CapeTownClimbing.com
uGo
Posts: 17
Joined: Wed Aug 25, 2010 10:26 am
Real Name: Hugo Krynauw

Re: packpack

Post by uGo »

quality and all of those things, definitely, but sometimes less well looked for is details in the fit. Three things:

Put some weight in the pack when you think you like something. Just a fat tent or something like that. Say around 10kg. A lot of salespeople frown when you ask them to do this, but who cares - packs are different when they are loaded.

Waist and back sizing. My current North Face Badlander has the issue that the back height is perfect for me, but the waist strap is too big. By the 4th day it is sitting too loose, meaning my shoulders get hammered. (As an aside, anybody have advice with fixing this, bar eating more?)

YKK zips!!! I doubt any manufactures who makes decent gear uses something else. Lifetime garauntee, as long as you have not been hacking the thing to pieces. I have only had one YKK fail on me, and it was incorparated in a bad design, but it is currently being replaced.

And then +1 to hydration pack incorporation and waterproofing, both things that I am lacking at the moment
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SuperM
Posts: 79
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2010 9:52 am
Location: Cape Town

Re: packpack

Post by SuperM »

Hey Jono,

Have a look at the Karrimor Panther 55-65 :thumright

Fully adjustable back system and rigid hip straps that are also adjustable - a must for long trad days

I'm also low to the ground and have a niggly lower back to boot, and find that you can adjust the fit perfectly so the bag sits on your hips and is very comfortable over your shoulders as the straps are ergonomically designed ie. no strap in your armpit!

I agree with uGo to weight the bag when trying it out as this will give you a better idea how the pack will sit with all your gear in it

Mountain Sport Magazine had a great write up on the Panther a couple of months ago

Definitely well in your price range including delivery to where you are! :afro:

Drop us a line!

Team Camp and Climb

GET GOING :bounce:
Super Mario
Hector
Posts: 430
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 8:21 pm

Re: packpack

Post by Hector »

To all the suppliers, have a look at bringing PodSacs into SA. Hands down the best packs I've seen.
http://www.podsacs.com/
Chris F
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Location: Aberdeen, Scotland

Re: packpack

Post by Chris F »

Justin wrote: Q: What do you want to use the bag for?
The million dollar question. A weekend hiking pack will be pretty different to one you will use for cragging or alpine route or ski touring etc etc.

I've used a Black Diamond Sphynx 42l for general winter / summer mountain routes and longer ski tours for a while and think it's a great pack; bomb proof, all the bits you need and none you don't, comfortable, and nice clean lines. I'm a bit of a langgat though, I think there's a 32l version available too.
jono
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Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2011 12:03 pm
Real Name: jon kirkman

Re: packpack

Post by jono »

Hi,
Marshall1 wrote:Q: What do you want to use the bag for?
Actually, pretty much everything from three--four night hikes to days at the crags (when I get my own gear that is) to travelling :) . So I 'm pretty much looking for a comfortable all-rounder of a fairly large size :cyclops: .
Thanks for all the advice (and the offer to lend me your bag Justin).

cheers :afro:
jon
Marshall1
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Re: packpack

Post by Marshall1 »

Jon, that sounds like a 90L Packpacker Thar, its up to you what you put in it.
NikkiPhysio
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed May 12, 2010 6:29 pm
Real Name: Nikki Parker

Re: packpack

Post by NikkiPhysio »

What are the Deuter 70+15 packs like?
Usage would be multi-day hikes/trekking. I'm also around the 1.65m range in height.
smityb
Posts: 81
Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2011 8:07 pm
Real Name: Brandon
Location: western cape

Re: packpack

Post by smityb »

In my opinion a 70+15 pack would be a bit big unless you have a really huge sleeping bag, with this being said deuters are german 'engineered' and are very good quality. Another option is the Vaude accept which is available in 75L and also a very good make.
NikkiPhysio
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Re: packpack

Post by NikkiPhysio »

Nope, sleeping bag is of normal size. A few people have mentioned that it may be too large. Thanks for your feedback Brandon.
May look at the 60+10 or 65+10 instead. German engineered... always high in my books. :)
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