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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2006 1:36 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2005 9:39 am
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Location: Pretoria
Hi there,

I am in the market for high end trekking / mountaineering boots. The problem seems to be that these items are not readily available in South Africa. I am interested in the La Sportiva Lhotse / Glacier Evo. Basically has to be goretex, no drilex/simpatex + nikwax worries. Anyone know where I can buy these and what a reasonable price would be?

- twiga


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2006 3:33 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2005 8:31 am
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Location: Montagu
Real Name: Justin Lawson
Contact the distributors to find out if anyone stocks them:
Outward Ventures - www.outward.co.za

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2006 5:25 pm 
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Location: Pretoria
Spoke to outward ventures, they don't import the Glacier evo, so that one is out I guess. They refered me to a retailer in Pretoria which actually has stock of the Lhotses. WOWIIEEE!! At R 3500, I will need to pimp out my gf to buy these boots. Anyone looking for a good time :P

The Lhotses are way cheaper if bought over the Internet (seems the local guys make lots of money on these items). But the sizing could be an issue.

Anyone know of any cheaper alternatives?

-twiga


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 1:09 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 05, 2005 5:39 pm
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Location: JHB
Your best option is to try and find someone heading to Europe and plead with them to bring the boots you want back with them.

As an alternative to the Lhotse, you may want to think about the Nepal Evo Extreme's. They really are an awesome boot. I recently got a friend to bring a pair back for me which cost me 315 Eur = R3000. The boots really are awesome. It's really unfortunate that Outward Ventures dosen't bring in these boots. It seems that they only bring in the upper and lower extremes of the mountaineering boots range. I know Drifter's stock the Nuptse but that boot is probably overkill and it'll set you back a couple of Rands.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 1:45 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 11:01 am
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What is your shoe size?


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 1:46 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2005 9:39 am
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Location: Pretoria
South African prices are such a ripoff. I see you can get the Nuptse on the Internet for $ 299 (on special). Wow at R 2100.00 that is even cheaper for what the Lhotses goes locally, and it's a ten times better boot (for cold high stuff). Might be a bit overkill for an all purpose mountaineering boot. But still an amazing price.

How did you get your friend from Europe to get you the right size?


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 1:47 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2005 9:39 am
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Location: Pretoria
I wear a size 9 UK - Like everbody :)


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 4:38 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 11:01 am
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Get in contact with me via email @ jesterhuyse@oldmutual.com, you may be interested in a 2nd hand pair of La Sportiva Nepal boots?


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 11:40 am 
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Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 1:23 pm
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Location: Gauteng
Twiga,

bought a pair two years ago (in Centurion, probably at the same store you refer to) and directly went on a 1 month trip to Peru with them as my only boots. Since then have done 300+km of hiking/trekking at altitude and some water ice climbing and had very little problems (other boots I tried bit into my heels).

I bought them as a second pair of mountaineering boots that can be used for steep ice climbing. I wanted something that can serve as approach boots for ice climbing / mountaineering at altitude/cold where you simply can't take two pairs.

Some comments:
    * They are heavy and rigid (but comfortable) and the ideal would be to have a second pair of lightweight hiking boots for trips on easier terrain / general use (if you can afford it)
    * They are warm, especially in summer (expect lots of sweaty socks) but is not a substitute for plastic boots if you are spending more than 2 days at altitude above the snow line (they soak up moisture & freeze & do not dry quickly) - I only use them in winter in SA
    * Despite the full steel shank, the toe flexes by about 1cm which is just enough to make hiking easier without affecting steep waterfall ice climbing with a rigid / semi-rigid crampon (the other similar La Sportiva boots have less flex). The rocking sole assists in making hiking in them comfortable
    * I experienced no problems with waterproofing but the suede does soaks up water and freeze solid
    * Like many similar boots it has a soft fabric cuff which attracts and keeps grass seeds and other irritating bits of vegetation which is not ideal for SA conditions but you often do not have a choice
    * Earlier versions of the boot had quality problems with the sole that came loose but I saw no indication of this on my pair
    * The complete toe part of the boot (the upper part too) is rubberised which is excellent and something I'd definitely look for in my next pair of boots
    * Have just returned from Mt. Kenya where I was surprised to find that they performed quite well on long rock routes (up to about grade 16 but with little/no friction climbing) and I left my climbing shoes at the bottom
    * The steel shank sets of the metal detector on every dam airport :(

My other pair of boots is a aging pair of Scarpa Lhakda (sp?) boots that has done 1000km plus which I can also recommend as a lighter boot, but it is not an ice climbing boot (3/4 shank).

Most of the above comments would hold for any similar decent boot I think. The most important factor in choosing this kind of boot is fit: I think this type of boot do not adapt to your foot - your foot is more likely to adapt to it if anything.

Regards


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 7:50 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2005 9:39 am
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Location: Pretoria
Wow Dean, thanks for your great post.

La Sportiva markets the Lhotse's for \"Extreme Mountaineering\" guess thats a pretty relative term huh? Would I be able to stroll up Aconcagua in these / Mont Blanc? Guess not...

I also own a pair of HanWag GTX leather trekking boots which are quite nice to use in summer, so the La Sportiva won't be my only boot.

-twiga


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2006 12:59 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 1:23 pm
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Location: Gauteng
twiga,

I think some of my post was a bit confusing and I should clarify: I said that \"only use them in winter in SA\" meaning to imply that they are too warm for use in summer for me and I only use them in winter in SA but I definitely would not say one can not use them (or similar boots) for high altitude mountaineering. I have used them on a number of occasions on 5000m+ at temperatures up to -8 degrees and only once did I have some concern for cold toes and even then it was not that bad (this was after a day and a half above the snow/glacier level and after walking up a snowy pass with rather moist snow).

I guess it depends on what your definition of \"extreme\" conditions is. My personal little theory is that problem comes when you have to deal with moisture and cold for a few continuous days (e.g. damp/snowy conditions for 3 or more days with -10 degree and below temperatures and sleeping in tents) where the leather boots and their linings soak up moisture and freeze. You can do very little about that if you are not using a nice alpine hut with those boot drying gadgets one finds in the European alpine huts. In dry conditions I have found that one can get good insulation from a few pairs of good, specialised socks that you dry in your sleeping bag each night. I know there are plenty of people who use leather boots in \"extreme\" conditions (just look at the kit the early expeditions took to the big mountains) but I'd rather be a bit cautious and upgrade to double boots (you can easily manage the moisture by drying the inner boot in your sleeping bag etc and the insulation is very good).

As to Mt. Blanc and Aconcagua: my little experience does not go that far, but I know people do them in leather boots which to me makes sort of sense (in terms of my little theory) because doing the normal routes on those peaks you do not spend that much time above the snow line. I am sure there are other people of this forum that have that kind of experience and can comment here …


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 3:24 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2006 4:11 pm
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Location: Kigali, Rwanda
twiga wrote:
I will need to pimp out my gf to buy these boots. Anyone looking for a good time :P



Please post picture. :lol: :lol:


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