Hiking Peru Info

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JamesR
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2013 8:35 am
Real Name: James Robey

Hiking Peru Info

Post by JamesR » Sat Jun 18, 2016 3:00 pm

Hi All

I'm going to be spending some time in Peru and Bolivia in July/August. Was wondering if anyone has some tips/ideas of some "not so touristy" hiking routes to do in and around the Huaraz and the Cordillera Huayhuash/Blanca areas.

Thanks!

johannlanz
Posts: 130
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2011 3:52 pm
Real Name: Johann Lanz
Location: Stellenbosch

Re: Hiking Peru Info

Post by johannlanz » Fri Jun 24, 2016 3:08 pm

Did quite a cool multi day hike from one valley to the next in the Blanca when I was there in 2000. It wasn't on the tourist route at all - there was no one else on the route at the time. We were told about it by a local. Of course it may have become much more popular in the interim. I still have a map of the area and can look up the details if you're interested.

JamesR
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2013 8:35 am
Real Name: James Robey

Re: Hiking Peru Info

Post by JamesR » Wed Jun 29, 2016 7:48 pm

Hi Johann
Not to worry, thanks, I'll find a map when I get there and just wing it!
Appreciate the reply

DeanVDM
Posts: 152
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 1:23 pm
Location: Gauteng

Re: Hiking Peru Info

Post by DeanVDM » Wed Jul 06, 2016 8:39 am

The Cordillera Huayhuash trek in Peru is one of the best - the whole trek requires about 12 or so days. It is quote strenuous as it has one or two 4 000m passes every day - if you take the side treks closer to the mountain on some of the days on the Northern side you'll have spectacular views and some of the best trekking South America has to offer. The trek can be done in shorter time (the northern and North Eastern sections are the best) but will require help of a guide as public transport from the more remote towns can be tricky and you'll may have to use public busses that are infrequent. The "standard" Santa Cruz trek is busier in the middle of the season and has become very commercialised with little spaza shops on the first day or two of the (one way) route. The Cordillera Blanca logistic is relatively easy to arrange in Hauraz and you can go just about anywhere with very little preparation. Depending on your ability and objectives there are trekking peaks of every grade within easy access (but make sure you have spent at least a week acclimatizing on a high trek before the time). I have used the services of the "Mount Climb" shop in Huaraz (might be a bit difficult to find but its down from the Plaza De Armaz?) a number of times - its run by a mountaineer and not a "tour guide". As in other parts of the world if you have little time to get to know the conditions and logistics using a local guide buys you time and safety and if the guide can speak good English you'll get much more insight into a spectacular country.

Some write-ups in the MCSA journals as well as here:
http://www.climbing.co.za/2011/08/mcsa- ... ing-there/

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