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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2005 11:42 am 
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I recently washed my rope (Beal Edlinger) with woolite for the second time. After rinsing it really well (At least a couple times) and flaking it to dry in a shaded room, i noticed a white, waxy residue had formed on the sheath esp. on the corners that were folded over. It was just a minor residue, not too thich or widespread. Is this normal? I didnt get any of it last time i washed the rope...

Also, i used a beal rope brush to wash the rope. While running the brush over the rope, i noticed the sheath tended to bunch up in certain areas and i'd have to tug the brush over these spots. Is this normal when using a rope brush? Does it cause any damage?

Thanks for the help


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2005 12:31 pm 
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Hey clobberer,

I am no expert but the white, waxy residue is probably from the detergent, maybe a few more rinse cycles may have been needed.

clobberer wrote:

Also, i used a beal rope brush to wash the rope. While running the brush over the rope, i noticed the sheath tended to bunch up in certain areas and i'd have to tug the brush over these spots.


As for the sheath bunching up, that sounds very suspicious to me as most Beal ropes have a zero sheath slippage factor.

I have contacted Beal and asked them for their insight to your problem. I will get back to you on this issue.

I have also asked them for a complete run down on rope maintenance as there seems too many different points of view out there.

_________________
\"If you don't break your ropes while you're alive do you think ghosts will do it after?\" -
Kabir


Last edited by timmy on Thu Nov 17, 2005 11:34 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2005 12:54 pm 
Why on earth would you wash a rope?? I have never bothered in twenty years of climbing, and everyone I have spoken to who has, has had some kind of problem. Just climb the thing to death! Use a tarpaulin and it wont get that dirty in the first place


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2005 12:56 pm 
hi, I'm not too sure if woolite is a good thing for ropes. It's a very different chemical to the 'whip wash' type cleaners. The ropes do hold alot of water so perhaps the previous post is correct in saying that it needs further rinsing. The sheath slippage is not a good thing. I've never had this and I've used those beal brushes for years. You never know what chemical can affect a ropes delicate inners. Perhaps something that is good for wool might not have the same reaction to the rope's compounds. I just recomend doing 3 or 4 rinses in the washing machine. Spin dry it well and then see. Every time I've used the whip wash I've had to rinse it many more times than they reccomend so I'm sure it's just retention that you've got. But seriously, if you buy a car and they tell you to use a certain type of oil, why use something else? You should always use the correct cleaners as these have been formulated and tested by the rope companies and although they are overpriced it's worth having a rope you can trust 100%. Just my R0.02


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2005 2:01 pm 
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Hey clobberer,
still waiting on Beal to get back to me, should be sometime next week.


this is what New England Ropes had to say:

Quote:
\" I recently washed my rope(dynamic) with woolite(light detergent for delicate fabrics) for the second time. ....... [[Stephen Parola] A light detergent will help get out any grains of dirt (or salt). Dynamic ropes, specifically dry ropes have a coating applied to repel water. What you see is that dry coating

Also, i used a beal rope brush to wash the rope. While running the brush over the rope, i noticed the sheath tended to bunch up...... \"[Stephen Parola] I do not have any experience with those rope brushes; however it sounds like you are seeing some sheath slippage. Sheath slippage doesn't harm the rope, but it is a nuisance particularly if you are climbing. I am surprised you would see significant sheath slippage with a rope brush, I would recommend you contact beal to see if they have recommendations regarding the brush and how it is being used.


I am waiting for Beal and Mammut to get back to me on this issue so hang ten before deciding if your rope is safe. Lets see what they have to say so we can get a better picture.

_________________
\"If you don't break your ropes while you're alive do you think ghosts will do it after?\" -
Kabir


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2005 3:06 pm 
I Agree with Greg - no need to wash your rope unless you have stomped in in some mud / other grimy sunstance. Timmy & Weazil hit the nail on the head - Best thing to use is a proper rope soap or Nikwax Tech Wash. Dont need to over rinse as there sould be no residue with these products. Normally you stick your rope into a pillow slip & cable tie it closed if you intend doing a machine wash.

I've never heard of a rope brush causing sheath slippage - highly unlikely.

Local Beal agents are RAM Mountaineering - 021 532 0549 if you dont get a quick response from Beal Int.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2005 12:07 pm 
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Hey clobberer, news from Beal:

Quote:
The white residue you saw comes from the Nylon yarn we use to make the ropes. During it’s extrusion, Nylon yarn have to be coated with a slidy coating in order to make easier it’s circulation on the different machines.

This coating is not always well fixed and sometimes goes away of the rope as you describe it. There is not safety issue and no consequences on the life time of the rope.

I did not understood what you meant when you say “the sheath tended to bunch up in certain areas”. I guess it is small sheath slippage. Edlinger ropes have very soft sheath which make them nice to use, but it can induce very small located sheath slippage. There are no consequences, and these spots will disappear during your next utilisation.
Antoine Auffret - Beal

Hope that helps, but if you are not sure and feel a little uneasy, rather get the rope checked out properly.

I am going to post a thread in the Gear Questions and review section on rope care and maintenance... and will update it as info comes in from the various manufacturers.

_________________
\"If you don't break your ropes while you're alive do you think ghosts will do it after?\" -
Kabir


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2005 1:01 pm 
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hey hey,
some feedback from Mammut about rope brushes

Quote:
We do not recommend to use this brush.

The use of this brush can cause sheath-slippige of considerable amount on any rope.

I think this happened in your case.


Ralf Benischke - Mammut

_________________
\"If you don't break your ropes while you're alive do you think ghosts will do it after?\" -
Kabir


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2005 8:39 am 
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Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 9:06 am
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Location: Cape Town
I think you trashed your rope dude. :(
Maybe Father Christmas will bring you a new one?


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:47 am 
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Joined: Fri Apr 29, 2005 3:33 pm
Posts: 100
Location: Cape Town
Real Name: Riki Lawson
Check out the article 'When should I retire my rope'

http://www.climbing.co.za/articles.asp


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2005 1:00 pm 
Interesting feedback from the rope manufacturers. I once had a can of motorcycle chain lubricant leak onto a brand new rope! Needless to say huge panic and much cursing, however the lube was a silicone based product which luckily did not react with the rope (sigh of relief). I used a detergent to clean off the worst (something gear manufacturere do not recommend) but according to my chemist father there is little reaction in Nylon to occasional exposure to detergent. Therope went on to serve me for many years and held several falls happily.

So dont panic about your rope, its fine! just use it, the kinks and limited slippage spots will (as stated by Beal) disappear with use. But again keep it clean with a rope bag and groundsheet and you should never have to wash it, I usually wear my ropes out long before they look like they need cleaning. One trick is to use compressed air to blow dust and chalk off the ends if they get too grimy to be an efficent fashion accessory!


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